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Co-Chairs

Connie Chang-Hasnain

Fumio Koyama

Yasuhiko Arakawa

University of California
Berkeley

Tokyo Institute of
Technology

University of Tokyo

USA

Japan

Japan


 

Objectives

The physics of nanoscale materials and the devices based on them has now become an important area for research and development in both academic and industry laboratories. The iNOW 2008 workshop will engage participants in considerations of state-of-the-art nanoscale semiconductor processing and synthesis, the new physics of tailoring material's optical and electrical properties, new advances in characterization techniques, and new devices with novel functionalities. Tutorial-style lectures on the key areas of nano-photonics by eminent scientists from Japan, Germany, China, Korea, Russia, Sweden, and the United States comprise the core of the workshop. Three rump sessions will expose and discuss the various perspectives of the experienced researchers. Four poster sessions will present the work of international students and postdoctoral fellows. Two of the poster sessions will be held jointly with the annual Symposium on Optical Communications-an important event attended by many leaders in the Japanese optoelectronics industry as well as national academia-allowing the work of young scientists to reach an influential audience. The student poster presentations, rump sessions, specially arranged tours of company labs, and excursions that include a full day on Mt. Fuji (highlighting the Yamanashi Winery) as well as a day trip to Kamakura insure participants ample time for interaction and in-depth discussions. The iNOW 2008 workshop promises opportunities for intense interaction-inspiring presentations, exciting discussions, and invigorating debates. We hope and expect that your experiences here will stimulate future collaborations and spark future breakthroughs.

Duration

                                    6pm August 2nd to ~12 noon August 15th, 2008

 

deadlines

                                    6/1/08            Registration on line

                                    6/1/08            Abstract Submission

                                   6/1/08           Registration fee to Professor Fumio Koyama at Tokyo Institute of Technology (by credit card)

Technical Topics

·         Photonic Crystal and Devices

·         Nano-Opto Devices and Materials

-     Including self-assembly of quantum dots, nanowire epitaxy, carbon nano-tubes, etc.

·         Physics of Nano- Structures

-     Including transport, single-dot spectroscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, light-matter interaction, plasmonics and left-handed materials, etc.

·         Advanced Technologies for Thin-Film Deposition and Processing

-     Including deposition technologies, e-beam lithography, stamping and imprint technologies

·         Solar Cells

·         LEDs and Lasers

-     Including amplifiers, detectors, integrated photonic circuits, etc.

·         Vision and Applications

Field Trip: NTT Labs & Fujitsu Labs

Japan's dominance of the market for manufactured consumer goods is a reflection of its leadership in high tech areas like telecommunications and information technology. Many of the advances in these technologies arise from the innovative research done by the Japanese photonics industry. Special tours of the NTT Photonics Laboratories and the Fujitsu research and development center, both located in Atsugi, have been arranged for the iNOW 2008 participants. The NTT Photonics Laboratories, part of the NTT Science and Core Technology Lab Group, supports these continuing innovations through research on the next generation of photonic device technologies. They are developing the latest photonics devices by combining three core technologies: optical semiconductor research, optical glass materials, and ultra-high-speed electronic device technology. This R&D advances the goals of the network of NTT companies, and the companies then spread these innovations around the globe through technology transfers and commercialization. Fujitsu Laboratories conducts path-breaking R&D on a broad range of technologies that is helping make ubiquitous networking a reality. From innovative IT services to computers, networks, and other platforms, to cutting-edge electronic devices, they are creating the technologies of the future, and making them work together in bold new ways. As the central pillar of the Fujitsu Group's research and development efforts, they make essential contributions to the IT solutions offered by Fujitsu to customers while also achieving landmark advances in scientific research.

Excursion Trips

1. Full-day excursion to the Mt. Fuji area including a visit to the Yamanashi Winery (scheduled for Wednesday 06 August)

Located on the north shore of Lake Saiko, the Yamanashi Winery is Japan’s second largest producer of what is traditionally known as ‘grape liquor’. The nation’s first commercial winery was established here in 1875, taking advantage of the relatively dry climate to raise grapes instead of rice. The grapevines are arranged in steeply terraced hedges to maximize sun exposure and take advantage of the unusual local growing conditions.

We will have the opportunity to sample and enjoy the wines here in the best-known wine-producing prefecture of Japan, encircled by natural vistas in the shadow of Mount Fuji.

Mount Fuji, just west of Tokyo, is the highest peak in Japan at 3,776 m. It is still an active volcano, achieving its current photogenic symmetrical shape just 10,000 years ago. Long a sacred site, Mount Fuji is now a popular tourist and climbing spot, with 30% of the 200,000 annual visitors to the summit coming from outside Japan. We will take a tour bus up to the highest point open to vehicle traffic, the fifth station, at around 2,300 m. There are plenty of paths from there to the summit but the climb requires most of a day. Many shrines, teahouses, and rest huts can be found along the routes.

2. A one-day tour of Kamakura (scheduled for Sunday 10 August)

A thousand years ago, at the height of the imperial court, Kamakura was the seat of the Shogunate, and as the chief city of Kanto, the largest in Japan and fourth largest on the earth. Today it is a popular tourist destination southwest of Tokyo for both beach-goers and those interested in temples and shrines.

The best known relic is the great Amida Buddha statue “Daibutsu” which was originally housed in a 13th century temple. The temple was destroyed by a tsunami in the 15^th century so the 13-meter-tall bronze now stands in the open air. Daibutsu is second in height only to the Buddha statue in Nara’s Todaiji Temple.

The city is home to five great Zen temples and many historical monuments recalling the importance of the region during Japan’s wars with the Mongols.

From temples to Zen gardens to beaches and microbreweries, Kamakura is sure to provide a refreshing visit.

 

Steering Committee

Markus Amann, Technical University of München

Yasuhiko Arakawa, University Tokyo (ex-officio)

Dieter Bimberg, Technical University of Berlin

Connie Chang-Hasnain, UC Berkeley (ex-officio)

Zhangyuan Chen, Peking University

Alfred Forchel, University Wuerzburg

Tingye Li, AT&T Labs (Retired)

Tien P. Lee, Telcordia (Retired)

Yi Luo, Tsinghua University

Fumio Koyama, Tokyo Institute of Technology (ex-officio)

Ivan Kaminow, UC Berkeley